These Old Windows

By Pat Saxton
Museum Director

Continuing our efforts to renovate Guinep House through funds from the TCIG Infrastructure Fund, we installed new windows on the second floor of the Museum.  Renovations to a 200-year-old house are never easy. To the untrained eye, one would think that the windows were fine. However, there always seems to be something unknown lurking behind the paint!  True to form the windows were no different

The sills had degraded over time because of wet rot. Photo by Rene Carrillo AND Construction

The sills had degraded over time because of wet rot. Photo by Rene Carrillo, AND Construction.

Deep reveals are common in a house this old

Deep “reveals” or sills are common in a house this old. The new window in place before the addition of the new sills. Photo by Rene Carrillo, AND Construction

Not only were the shutters rotten, which had not been opened in years, but the windows themselves had succumbed to the weather and insect damage.  Luckily, the insect damage was stopped through the efforts of AND Construction last year. However, all of the mechanics of the windows had failed and wet rot had invaded the deep reveals that surround the windows.

We were able to close the Museum to the public for 5 days, including the weekend—while the work was completed.  Any renovation is never easy but being a Museum that means covering or moving everything. Not an easy task when under a time limit.

New surrounds and sills. Photo by Rene Carrillo, AND Construction.

New surrounds and sills. Photo by Rene Carrillo, AND Construction.

AND Construction, under the leadership of Rene Carrillo (Project Manager) not only finished on time, but cleaned up every bit of dust, and residue from the work.  The windows look great, in fact one would never know they were even replaced, because AND Construction made sure they kept the integrity of the building….now that is a good renovation!

Completed window! AND to the rescue once again. Photo by Rene Carrillo, AND Construction.

Completed window! AND to the rescue once again. Photo by Rene Carrillo, AND Construction.